Slash-And-Burn Agriculture, Conversion to Pasture, And Deforestation in Two Brazilian Amazon Colonies.

TitleSlash-And-Burn Agriculture, Conversion to Pasture, And Deforestation in Two Brazilian Amazon Colonies.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1996
AuthorsFujisaka S, Bell W, Thomas N, Hurtado L, Crawford E
ContactAuthorasb@cgiar.org, s.fujisaka@cgiar.org
JournalAgriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Volume59
Issue1-2
Pagination115-130
KeywordsColonies, Deforestation, land use, Pasture, slash-and-burn
AbstractTropical deforestation is higher in Latin America than in Africa and Asia. Available literature indicates that deforestation rates in the Amazon Basin of Brazil increased after the early 1960s due in large part to national policies supporting road building, tax and credit incentives to large corporations and ranches, and colonization projects for the rural poor. Changes in these policies have contributed to the declining rates of deforestation observed over the last decade. Settlers were interviewed in two Amazon colonies about land use, and rates and causes of deforestation. Farmers in Pedro Peixoto, Acre, cleared about 2 ha per year per family, and settlers in Theobroma, Rondonia, cleared some 3 ha per year to produce first rice, which was then followed by beans, maize and cassava. Settlers then converted land to pasture not only to raise cattle, but also as a way to add substantial value to their lands for ‘improvements’—i.e. for more clearing, pasture, fencing, corrals and ponds. Analysis of satellite images of the Pedro Peixoto site agreed with data reported by farmers on rates of deforestation and improved our understanding of the dynamics of deforestation.
URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0167880996010158
DOI10.1016/0167-8809(96)01015-8