Peru

The ASB Partnership started work in Peru in 1994 at two different sites: Ucayali and Yurimaguas in the Peruvian Amazon. Researchers have quantified the environmental and socio-economic impacts of land use change at these 2 sites.

The Ucayali benchmark site covers approximately 1.6 million hectares of tropical forest biome. Fifty years of deforestation and a steadily growing population have led to a wide range of land uses in the area making it ideal for assessing the impacts of land use change. The main town in the Ucayali region, Pucallpa, experienced a 7-fold population increase from the 1960s to the mid 1990s.

Experimental agronomic research data have been collected at the Yurimaguas benchmark site for nearly 30 years. This site provides an interesting comparison with Pucallpa as here the population only doubled between 1971 and 1985.

 The implications of growing populations are seen in the rapidly changing land uses around both the Ucayali and Yurimaguas urban centres.

 

The road towards Brazil in Madre de Dios Province, Peru: Once this is paved it will undoubtedly bringing deforestation with itThe road towards Brazil in Madre de Dios Province, Peru: Once this is paved it will undoubtedly bringing deforestation with it

View ASB Benchmark Sites in Peru in a larger map
 

 

Over time, the ASB-Peru consortium has measured the environmental and socio-economic impacts of land use change in the Peruvian Amazon. It has evaluated the effects of alternative land use practices with respect to:

  • Climate change (greenhouse gas fluxes and carbon sequestration)
  • Biodiversity (above- and belowground)
  • Agronomic sustainability
  • Socio-economics

Central to the research is an analysis of the tradeoffs that arise among the different environmental, economic and social objectives.This research is summarized in the
Alternatives to Slash-and-Burn in Peru: Summary Report and Synthesis of Phase II (PDF).

Activities

ASB partners in Peru are currently engaged in the following ASB projects

 

 
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