New Face for Traditional Commons: Forest Conversion and the Redefinition of Common Property and Individual Rights through Agroforest Development in Sumatra, Indonesia.

TitleNew Face for Traditional Commons: Forest Conversion and the Redefinition of Common Property and Individual Rights through Agroforest Development in Sumatra, Indonesia.
Publication TypeWorking Paper
AuthorsMichon G, de Foresta H, Levang P
ContactAuthorasb@cgiar.org, Michon(michon@engref.fr)
Secondary TitlePaper presented at Vth Conference of the International Association for the Study of Common Property Resources, at Bodo, Norway
Call NumberPP0029-04
PublisherORSTOM and International Centre for Research in Agroforestry, SEA Regional Research Programme
Place PublishedBogor, Indonesia
Year of Publication1995
Pagination1-13
Publication LanguageEnglish
AbstractForest resources in the tropics have mainly been managed by indigenous communities as common property resources, but it is often acknowledged that these common property regimes presently tend to evolve into more privatized rights as deforestation and monetization of subsistence economies proceed. It is also often argued that common property regimes remain successful as long as the main purpose of the forest is for subsistence, but that, as commoditization of forest resources occurs, private property is better adapted to efficiently and sustainably manage the forest for commercial purposes. Global economic and social changes presently affecting traditional forest communities, as well as large-scale ecological changes occurring in forest areas do induce mutation of local production systems that have important consequences on tenure rights and regulations. It is true that the spread of commercial strategies in forest management often leads to a more or less severe deregulation of traditional resource appropriation regimes and forces the evolution of both techniques and regulations governing resource management. However, relating subsistence strategies to common property and commercial strategies to private property is a far too simple dichotomy. “Domestication” and “privatization” dynamics of forest lands and commercial forest resources are far from being linear and universal. Variations and transformations of property systems refer to the variety of new technical choices and of new modes of production. They are also closely related to the evolution of social relationship and perception systems. Whereas the forest is being transformed and private land rights emerge more and more in the forest tropics, some original management systems tend to re-establish forest resources in agricultural lands and to give a new dimension to traditional community rights. Understanding the why’s and how’s of the evolution of these systems can help us redefining the concept of forest commons and common management of forest lands and resources
Keywordsagroforest, face, forest, Indonesia, redefiniton of common, Sumatra, traditional commons
URLhttp://www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/publication?do=view_pub_detail&pub_no=PP0029-04
Citation Key 149