REDD

Stewardship Agreements for REDD in Indonesia

Resolving the issue of who owns the forest is probably the biggest hurdle in the implementation of REDD+ in most countries and to succeed, legal structures and policy frameworks should promote ownership of the process by forest dependent communities. This is important because forest management initiatives must have the objectives of promoting both the wellbeing of forests and that of communities who rely on the forests as a source of livelihood.

To reconcile this, Indonesia has started to implement the Hutan Desa regulation which aims to resolve tenure conflicts through the provision of village forests. The agreement allows villages living in forest margins to become active forest management units. Although Hutan Desa is currently being applied in only one community in Indonesia, it offers lesson points for the large-scale application of the law to other communities.

Some of the points are analyzed in ASB’s latest policy brief 18 on "Stewardship Agreements to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) in Indonesia”. The brief highlights the need to reduce transaction costs and streamlining of rules for wider application of the law; international support in dealing with bottlenecks such as tenure conflicts; informal social networks comprising of key stakeholders such as government officials, NGO’s, and researchers are also important in the process though they can take a long time to develop. Read full policy brief

Other related publications

 

Related Publications

Linking REDD and NAMAs: ASB’s whole landscape approach can boost Indonesia’s emission reduction efforts

Indonesia has received tremendous attention recently after the president signed into law a two-year moratorium on logging in remaining primary forest and peatlands. Intense debate before and after this moratorium has clarified positions: only 25% of Indonesia is covered by the Moratorium, which includes all areas that already have conservation and national park status.

Integrating agriculture and forestry in the landscape is key to REDD

A multifunctional approach to REDD will be far more effective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing food production than the practice of intensifying agriculture and sparing forests

Map Identifies Most Vulnerable 'Spots' in the Wake of a Changing Climate

A new study matches future climate change ‘hotspots’ with regions already suffering chronic food problems to identify highly-vulnerable populations, chiefly in Africa and South Asia, but potentially in China and Latin America as well, where in fewer than 40 years, the prospect of shorter, hotter or drier growing seasons could imperil hundreds of millions of already

Experts Discuss Success Factors for REDD+ Implementation in Developing Countries

The initiative to Reduce Emission from Deforestation and Land Degradation, plus the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of carbon stocks in developing countries (REDD+) forged by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) holds great promise to efforts on tackling climate change.

A Smart-REDD project Addresses Drivers of Deforestation

A smart REDD project in Tanzania goes beyond compensating farmers for not converting forests to farmland and facilitates them to meet their needs through better use of the resources they already had - the project would put money towards fertilizer, seed and agricultural training to increase crop yields of existing farmland and help to meet the increasing demand for food.

Counting the Cost of Land Use Change and REDD+ in Latin America

This article first featured on the International Center for Tropical Agriculture’s (CIAT) blog. Over 50 public administration officials and economists from 15 countries in Latin America benefited from one week training on calculating opportunity costs of land use change

Syndicate content